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Blackwall hitch


The blackwall hitch is a temporary means of attaching a rope to a hook. Made of a simple half hitch over the hook, it will only hold when subjected to constant tension, It is used when the rope and hook are of equal size, but it is likely to slip if subjected to more than ordinary tension. Human life should never be trusted to it.
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Figure-eight Knot


The figure-eight knot is a type of knot. It is very important in both sailing and rock climbing as a method of stopping ropes from running out of retaining devices. Like the overhand knot, which will jam under strain, often requiring the rope to be cut, the figure of eight will also jam, but is usually more easily undone than the overhand knot.
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Bowline


The bowline is an ancient and simple knot used to form a fixed loop at the end of a rope. it has the virtues of being both easy to tie and untie; most netably, it is easy to untie after being subjected to a load, The bowline is sometimes referred as King of the Knotes because of of its importance. it is one of the four basic maritime knots.

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Double bowline


A double bowline (or round turn bowline) is a type of loop knot. instead of the single turn of the regular bowline, the double bowline uses a round turn. This forms a more secure loop than a standard bowline. [1] the Bowline on a bight, when re-threaded instead of being tied of bight, can also be used by tying into a climbing harness and provides more strength and security than the double bowline.
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Reef knot


The reef knot or square knot is an ancient and simple binding knot used to secure a rope or line around an object . Although the reef knot is often seen used for tying two ropes together, it is not recommended for this purpose due to potential instability of the knot.
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Half hitch


The half hitch is a simple overhand knot, where the working end of a line is brought over and under the standing part. Insecure on its own, it is a valuable component of a wide variety of useful and reliable hitches, bends, and knots. Two successive half hitches tied around an object makes up to common clove hitch. Two successive half hitches tied around the standing part a rope is known as two-half-hitches of double half hitch.
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Clove hitch


A clove hitch is a type knot. Along with the bowline and the sheet bend, it is often consivered one of the most important knots.[1] A clove hitch is two successive half-hitches around an object. It is most effectively used as a crossing knot. It can be used as a binding an knot, but is not particularly secure in that role. 92]. A clove hitch made around hte rops's own standing part is knownn as either two half-hitches or buntline hitch, depending on whether the turns of the clove hitch progress away from or towards the hitched object.
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Boom hitch


The Boom hitch is a type of knot . It is a rather robust and secure method of attaching a line, or rope ot a fixed object like a pipe , post , or sail boom. It can be finished with a slip , that is, a bight tucked under rather than the whole lone pulled through in the last step . This will make it easier to untie.
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Anchor bend


The Anchor Bend is a knot used for attaching a rope to a ring or similar termination. Its name originates from the time when "bend" was understood to mean "tie to". to",and not restricted to knots that join rope ends.
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Barrel hitch


The "barrel hitch" and "barrel sling." named for their use in hoisting cargo ships, are a simple yet effective way to suspend an object . The barrel sling lays the barrel on its side, while the barrel hitch keeps it vertical. They work by forming a "sling" around the object , which supports it from either side and underneath.
  • The barrel hitch is made by tying an overhand knot, leaving plenty of free rope at the working end, Where the rope crosses itself in hte middle of the knot (near the target), grab the strand of rope on top and bring it towards you, then lay it back down. The result should resemble stage 2: note where the target is
  • Place your object on top of the diagonal strand of rope in the centre of the knot.
  • Carefully draw the rope up at the working and fixed ends, forming the "sling" around the object. Tie the working end off using a bowline, making sure the sling is tight around the object.

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    Heaving line bend


    The heaving line bend is a quick and simple knot that is used to attach playing strings to the thick silk eyes of the anchorae knot.
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    Hitching tie


    The hitching tie is a simple knot used to tie off stuff sacks that allows quick access as it unties quickly. To untie the knot, just pull hard on the free enf of the rope and the knot will fall open. This is not a very strong knot for climbing or other extreme activities.
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    Sailor's hitch


    The sailor's hitch is a type of knot. which is a secure. jam-proof hitch. It is a type of knot that is defined as a type of hitch knot. A hitch is a type of knot that has the ability to fit to the size and shape of an object tha tit is being tied to. The sailor's hitch can be used in such a way that allows a smaller rope to be attached to a large rope. the smaller rope should be pulled to the left whilc the bight should go through the final tuck to form the final product of a sailor's hitch. This knot can also serve the purpose of a cleat hitch. There is another variation of the knot that is called the gripping sailors hitch. the sailor's hitch is commonly confused with the icice hitch, but it has distinctions with the last tuck of the knot that allows them to be different.
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    Carrick bend
    The carrick bend is a knot used for joining two lines, it is particularly appropriate for very heavy rope or cable that is too large and stiff to easily be fromed into other common bends. It will not jam even after carrying a significant olad or being soaked with water. As with many other members of the basket weave knot family, the carrick bend's aesthetically pleasing interwoven and symmetrical shape has also made it popular for decorative purpose
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    Thief Knot

    The Thief Knot resembles the reef knot except that the free, or bitter ends are on opposite sides. It is said that sailors would secure their belongings in a ditty bag using the thief knot, often with the ends hidden. If another sailor went through the bag, the odds were high the thief would tie the bag back using the more common reef knot, revealing the tampering, hence the name, it is difficult to tie by mistake, unlike the granny knot. The thief knot is much less secure than the already insecure reef knot . It unties itself if the lines are pulled when hte same action would seize a reef knot.
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    ground - line hitch

    The ground - line hitch is a type of knot used to attach a rope to an object. Worked-up and dressed properly, is it more secure than the single clove hitch and has less tendency to jam, but does not respond well to swinging. It can also be used as a simple binding knot and use is classed among several knots known as the Miller's knot. The ground-line hitch is also the start of a three-lead four-bight Turk's head.
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    Timber hitch


    The timber hitch is a knot used to attach a single length of rope to a cylindrical object. Secure while tension is maintained, it is easily untied even after heavy loading.
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    Buntline hitch


    The buntline hitch is a knot used for attaching a rope to an object. It is formed by passing the working end around an object, then making a clove hitch around the rope 's standing part, taking care that the turns of the clove hitch progress towards the object rather than away from it. Secure and easily tied the buntline hitch will jam when subjected to extreme loads, Given the knot's propsnsity to jam, it is often made in slipped form.
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    Sheet bend


    The sheet bend (also known as becket bend, weaver's knot and weaver's hitch) is a bend , that is, a knot that joins two ropes together . Double it is effective in binding lines of different diameter or rigidity securely together , although it has a tendency to work loose when not under load.
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    Rolling hitch


    The rolling hitch (or Magnus hitch ) is a knot used to attach a rope a rod, pole, or other rope. A simple friction hitch, it is used for lengthwise pull along an object rather than at right angles. The rolling hitch is designed to resist lengthwise movement for a single direction of pull.
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    Sheepshank


    The sheepshank is a type of knot that is used to shorten a rope or take up slack. This knot is not stable. It will fall apart under too much lad or too little load. The knot has several features which allow a rope to be shortened:
  • It provides two loops, one at each end of the knot which can be used to pass another rope through

  • The knot remains somewhat secure under tension: the coarser the rope the more secure it is (see Disadvantages, below)
  • The knot falls apart easily when tension is removed

  • A sheepshank Knot may be constructed as follows:
  • Pull a section of rope back and lay it alongside the rope, so that the rope forms a Z approximately 20 cm long.

  • Flatten the Z so that there are 3 section of rope lying alongside each other, with two U-bends where the rope reverses direction.

  • At each U-bend , grasp th U-bend in one hand, thus holding two of the rope sectio.s With the other hand form a small loop in the remaining section and draw it over the U-bend so that the loop forms a half hitch and says there if the free end of the rope is pulled taut. (Many people draw the small loop over facing the wrong way at least half of the time, instead, make with the U a half-hitch around the other part, by tucking through , then pull of the U staight,)
  • Repeat at the other U-bend

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    Gripping Sailor's hitch


    The Gripping Sailor's Hitch is a secure, jam-proof hitch used to tie one rope to another, or a rope to a pole, boom, spar, etc, when the pull is lengthwise along the object. It will even grip a tapered object, such as a marline spike. in the direction of taper, similar to the lcicle hitch. It is much superior ot the rolling hitch for that purpose.

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    Ossel hitch


    The ossel hitch is a knot used to attach & rope or line to an object. It was originally use on Scottish gill nets to tie small line to larger rope that supported the net. Ossel is actually the Scottish word for "gill net" and for the line attaching the net to the float rope.
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